This page, http://www.cs.uiowa.edu/~hzhang/c231/, is always under construction.


22C:231 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015

Prerequisites

Grades of C- or higher in 22C:031 and 22C:131.


12:30-1:45 TTh, Room 221 MLH


Instructor: Hantao Zhang
Office: 201B MLH,
Email: hzhang@cs.uiowa.edu,
Tel: 353 2545
Office hours: TuTh, 2:00-3:00pm, or by appoitment
Teaching assistant: Thamer Al Sulaiman
Office: 201N MLH,
Email: Thamer-Alsulaiman@uiowa.edu,
Tel:
Office hours: Mon, 1:00-3:00, Fri., 2:00-3:30, or by appoitment

Attention


I need to hear from anyone who has a disability, which may require some modification of seating, testing or other class requirements so that appropriate arrangements may be made. Please contact me during my office hours.


Textbooks

In addition, a number of class notes and handouts will be available through this course web site.


Course Purpose

This is an advanced course on algorithms. The overall goal is to introduce students to a number of advanced topics and techniques in Algorithm Design and Analysis. The following topics will be reviewed and studied:

Students should be prepared to put in considerable time and effort into reading to become familiar with these topics and gain experience with these techniques. At the end of the semester, students should have the knowledge required to identify areas which they would like to investigate in more depth in related courses.


Homeworks (8 homeworks, each counts for 4 percent of final score)

Assignments will cover the material from the text and the lectures. All assignments will be done individually, be collected and graded.

LATE-DUE HOMEWORK ARE NOT ACCEPTED.


Exams

There will be one midterm exam (on March 24, 2015, 25 percent) and one final exam (38 percent) in the final week.

Answer keys to the midterm exam

FOR THE POLICY ON CHEATING, SEE THE GRADUATE HANDBOOK OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE.


Class Participation (5 percent of final score)


Lecture Notes

You are expected to study all the material in each chapter covered in the readings even if that material is not explicitly discussed in class or in the homework. You are also expected to study the extra material presented in class which is not in the textbook. Material presented in class, but not in the book may appear on tests.

The lecture notes are a supplement to the course textbook. They are supposed to help you understand the textbook material better, they are not a replacement for either the textbook or the lecture itself.



Hantao Zhang
Updated