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22C:19 - Descrete Structures, Fall 2009

Prerequisites

Grades of C- or higher in Computer Science I.


10:30-11:20 MWF, Room 1505 Seamans Center


Instructor: Hantao Zhang
Office: 201B MLH
Email: hzhang@cs.uiowa.edu
Tel: 353 2545
Office hours: MWF, 1:00-2:00pm
Teaching assistant: Stanley Ziewacz
Office: 201C MLH
Email: sziewacz@cs.uiowa.edu
Tel: 353 2546
Office hours: Tu, 10:00-11:30am. Th, 9:00-10:45am, 201C MLH

Attention
The final exam will be 2:15-4:15pm, Wednesday, December 16, 2009, in the classroom.

Sample questions

Please use ICON to check your scores.


I need to hear from anyone who has a disability, which may require some modification of seating, testing or other class requirements so that appropriate arrangements may be made. Please contact me during my office hours.


FOR ALL THE POLICIES THAT ARE NOT MENTIONED HERE, PLEASE SEE THE WEBPAGE FOR UNDERGRADUATE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE . PLEASE ALSO SEE THE WEBPAGE OF COLLEGE OF LITERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE .


Textbook


Course Syllabus

Students should be prepared to put in considerable time and effort into reading to become familiar with these topics and gain experience with these techniques. At the end of the semester, students should have the knowledge required to identify areas which they would like to investigate in more depth in related courses.


Homeworks (12 homeworks, each counts for TWO percent of final score)

12 written assignments will be given, covering the material from the text and the lectures. All assignments will be collected in class and graded. They are to be done individually.

LATE-DUE HOMEWORK ARE NOT ACCEPTED.


Exams

There will be two midterm exams and one final exam. All midterms will be held during class time.

First Midterm on 09/23/09 (20 percent of final score)

Sample solutions

Second Midterm on 10/28/09 (20 percent of final score)

The Final Exam is in the week of 10/14-18/09 (30 percent of final score)


Class Participation (6 percent of final score)


Lecture Notes

You are expected to study all the material in each chapter covered in the readings even if that material is not explicitly discussed in class or in the homework. You are also expected to study the extra material presented in class which is not in the textbook. Material presented in class, but not in the book may appear on tests.

The lecture notes are a supplement to the course textbook. They are supposed to help you understand the textbook material better, they are not a replacement for either the textbook or the lecture itself.



Hantao Zhang
Updated 08-18-2009